Jump to content


Photo

Photographing Scale Models ... Color now up ...


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Paul Budzik

Paul Budzik

    Hooked For Life

  • LSP_Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 325 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:California

Posted 12 May 2017 - 01:44 AM

 

 

Paul


  • Peterpools, Joe66 and cib2265 like this

#2 Shaka HI

Shaka HI

    Senior Member

  • LSP_Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,783 posts

Posted 14 May 2017 - 08:00 PM

Awesome, Paul! I'll be getting that book! I'm a huge fan of your videos, but you look a little robotic on this one (more than usual)...

 

:)


  • Peterpools likes this

#3 Peterpools

Peterpools

    Senior Member

  • LSP_Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 23,669 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ridge, New York

Posted 14 May 2017 - 08:46 PM

Paul

Very good video and information. I'm pretty well versed in photography and color balance and management needs to start with the monitor. Even with a perfectly exposed image, including correct white balance, if your monitor isn't color calibrated, what your are seeing are not the actual colors in the file (the digital photo). Contrary to popular opinion, it is 100% impossible to calibrate your monitor by eye or with any program that comes with your monitor unless you have a monitor specifically made for photography and they are very expensive. I calibrate my iMac once a week with an X-Rite Colormunki Display, which contains both software and a calibration sensor which is a spectrophotometer ... it does most of the calibration adjustments by itself; I'm just along for the ride and enjoying a snack or two as it goes about it's business. Colors are being adjusted to a photographic standard (RGB or SRGB as examples), so we are all on the same page but most monitors are way too bright and that throws off the color as well. During the calibration, the unit also measure the luminescence of the room by the monitor and is left plugged into the monitor to adjust brightness during post procession sessions. All this really means is the colors you now see are the actual colors in your file (the digital photo). This is the biggest reason why an image that looks great on a monitor, isn't the same as the print because you aren't seeing the actual colors in the file. You are adjusting the colors based on your monitor which is not calibrated and the print is actually the colors in the file. There are numerous other reasons why what you see on you monitor and a print are different but this is the biggest reason, then paper and printer profiles ( how each responds to colors and what colors they can not duplicate and make substitutions for).

This is the reason we are all seeing the same photo of lets say a model on the forum but we are all seeing the different colors. At least if everyone had a calibrated monitor, we would be seeing the same colors, whether they are correct or not.

Easiest way to adjust your camera's white balance: just match the light you are taking the photo in with the setting in your white balance setting in your camera:

Outodoors: daylight, cloudy or shade

indoors: incandescent , tungsten, fluorescent.

This isn't auto - you are setting the WB as per the room light or outdoor light (time of day also has a lot to do with outdoor light temperature) for correct WB.

JEPG or RAW .. a whole new ballgame.

I'm not an auto type of photographer but most cameras set in Auto for White balance do a pretty good job. Remember your camera is a computer and create files which are the images.

Peter


Edited by Peterpools, 14 May 2017 - 08:58 PM.

  • TaffyMan, JT68, CANicoll and 5 others like this

On the bench: Trumpeter A6A Intruder VA-165 Boomers

USS Constellation 1971-72


#4 Joel_W

Joel_W

    Senior Member

  • LSP_Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,549 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Selden, New York, USA

Posted 15 May 2017 - 07:39 PM

   Pete, very nicely said. Like you pointed out for the vast majority of photographers shooting in Auto for WB is the correct way to go. Even in indoor situations, today's DSRLs are more then capable of determining the correct WB settings if left in Auto. Once switched to a manual setting I don't believe that all cameras will make the necessary finite adjustments as it would have in Auto mode. Like you, I do almost all my WB adjustments in Lightroom 6. 

 

  Honestly, I haven't owned a gray card for many years, and I've never seen or spoken with any photographers online or out in the field that actually uses one. 

 

   Personally, I'm hoping that Paul addresses the need for a proper photography booth with a basic light setup that will be of the greatest interest to those who want to take better pictures of their models in the next video. The use of a tripod and electronic shutter release is also an important element that should be included.

 

Joel   


  • Peterpools, CANicoll, Shaka HI and 1 other like this

​ 57JzwY.jpg

 

Just Completed: Trumpeter 1/32 Scale A-4E Scooter

On my Bench: Kitty Hawk 1/32 Scale AV-10A Bronco


#5 Peterpools

Peterpools

    Senior Member

  • LSP_Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 23,669 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ridge, New York

Posted 15 May 2017 - 09:26 PM

JA

Well said.

Using LRCC (6) and a X-Rite Color Checker, the WB Eye dropper when placed over one of four specific colors will correct the color balance perfectly as well. The Gray Card is for exposure not white balance as we once owned one and used it way back in the 60's; remember

Bro


  • Shaka HI and Joel_W like this

On the bench: Trumpeter A6A Intruder VA-165 Boomers

USS Constellation 1971-72


#6 DeanKB

DeanKB

    Senior Member

  • LSP_Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,423 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Caerdydd, Cymru, Deyrnas Unedig

Posted 15 May 2017 - 11:01 PM

JA

Well said.

Using LRCC (6) and a X-Rite Color Checker, the WB Eye dropper when placed over one of four specific colors will correct the color balance perfectly as well. The Gray Card is for exposure not white balance as we once owned one and used it way back in the 60's; remember

Bro

But Paul knows photography.

 

He's got an expensive camera and everything


  • Peterpools and Joel_W like this

"If thou behold bijoux that looketh, mayhap, both wondrous and goodly in truck for doit, thou should turneth thy cheek, as aught will cometh of thine actions, surety a USB cable, for chicanery is afoot"


#7 Joel_W

Joel_W

    Senior Member

  • LSP_Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,549 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Selden, New York, USA

Posted 16 May 2017 - 04:29 PM

But Paul knows photography.

 

He's got an expensive camera and everything

 

Dean,

  I just knocked over my late breakfast coffee reading this.  

 

 As I see it, Pete and I trump Paul because he shoots with Canon equipment, and we're Nikon type of guys.  :fight: 

 

Joel


  • Peterpools likes this

​ 57JzwY.jpg

 

Just Completed: Trumpeter 1/32 Scale A-4E Scooter

On my Bench: Kitty Hawk 1/32 Scale AV-10A Bronco


#8 Rainer Hoffmann

Rainer Hoffmann

    Senior Member

  • LSP_Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,117 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Syke, Germany

Posted 17 May 2017 - 11:33 AM

The Gray Card is for exposure not white balance as we once owned one and used it way back in the 60's; remember

Bro

 

Actually, a gray card is perfectly suited for adjustment of the white balance. The term "white balance" is a bit misleading, as it suggests, that it can only be achieved by measuring a white object. However, any color cast is most visible in medium gray objects (by definition white and black can't have a color cast). Medium gray in 8 bit digital pics is by definition RGB 128/128/128. A red shift might be something like RGB 140/110/110. Using the white balance tool for example in Lightroom would force the RGB values to three identical values, eg. 128/128/128 for medium gray or 210/210/210 for a light gray.

 

So, when photographing in a studio it makes a lot of sense to include a gray card in the first frame and use it as a reference for the white balance. Actually we did that back in the olden days when we used film.

 

Cheers

Rainer


Edited by Rainer Hoffmann, 17 May 2017 - 12:42 PM.

  • JT68 and modelingbob like this




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users