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As my compressor slowly weeps (need advice)


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#46 Nessus

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Posted 16 November 2017 - 07:29 PM

Jennings, I never said anything about explosion anywhere. I said leak.

Please make sure you read what is written. Yes, these things are everywhere, as are nitrogen, LPG and CNG cylinders (and others as well). And yes, they are hydrostatically tested beyond their normal operating limits to ensure they don't rupture in normal service.

Having first hand experience with nitrogen cylinders leaking into a room (that incidentally did have oxygen sensors), I am just relating an instance where a fitting on a tank has failed, leading to a compromised atmosphere, hence the word of caution.

And for the record, I have seen the results of a ruptured compressed air cylinder. Not pretty.

Anyway, back to our regular programming.

#47 Jennings Heilig

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 01:21 AM

If you go through life worrying about CO2 cylinders, you’re going to have a very unhappy life.

You could asphyxiate from the CO2 coming from your beer...

Edited by Jennings Heilig, 17 November 2017 - 01:22 AM.

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#48 Gigant

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 06:03 AM

To get maximum affect from any moisture trap, it must be located as far down (away from compressor) the air hose as possible so the air can cool in the hose. I have the hose run to the workbench where moisture trap is mounted. Then run hose to airbrush with sufficient "work" length. Nice that it is there within reach for purging on occasion too.

 

Adding that it is odd that they are sold with the trap mounted right on the compressor fitting!

 

That is exactly how I set mine up! I moved the traps and regulators from the compressor to a shelf above my work table, ran hoses to them, then run a pair of coiled hoses from the traps/regulators to the brushes. Works great!

 

This is the basic set-up that the Sparmax TC-2000 I recently bought uses.


:innocent: Tom

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#49 Nessus

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 09:30 AM

Thank for the feedback Jennings. As usual, (from purely my observations), missing the point.

As I don't wish to be banned from the forums, I'll leave it at that, other than to say other people have valid opinions and real world experience too.

Enjoy your day everyone.

#50 Mark_C

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Posted 17 November 2017 - 10:51 AM

If you go through life worrying about CO2 cylinders, you’re going to have a very unhappy life.

You could asphyxiate from the CO2 coming from your beer...

 

Dude, that's not fair.  Nessus is trying to make a serious point and you mocking him doesn't add a thing.



#51 Thomas Lund

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 12:37 PM

Just to set a few things straight with CO2.

 

CO2 in a bottle is in saturated state as long as it's below 31°C and above -56°C. Saturated means that both liquid and vapor exist in the bottle. The pressure in the bottle depends on the (storage) temperature. At 22.2°C (72F) the saturation pressure is 60.60 bar (879 psi) absolute.

 

Drawing vapor from the bottle reduce the pressure and temperature drops as well. However due to heat transfer from the surroundings, it will heat up again, liquid evaporates and pressure will be restored, until no more liquid is available.

 

Increased levels of CO2 will cause shortness of breath, headaces and eventually death. However that is for concentrations above 10% and with such a bottle I don't think it's realistic. In my line of business where we deal with many metric tons of CO2, it is a real danger so we have CO2 sensors, especially in low rooms - basements are particularily dangerous as CO2 can collect there.


Edited by Thomas Lund, 23 February 2018 - 04:26 PM.

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